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IGIS Blog

IGIS Releases New Map of the UCANR Network

IGIS is pleased to release a new map of the ANR network. This poster-size map of the state includes 60 Cooperative Extension Offices, 9 RECS, and 6 affiliated campuses. The legend is accompanied by short descriptions of the main components of ANR, as well as logos of the Statewide Program and Institutes. As far as we know, this is the first attempt ever to map the entire ANR continuum.

Designing the map took several months. Our goal was to create a map that would serve both as a useful reference as well as communicate ANR's mission, structure, and programmatic breadth. Shane Feirer and Andy Lyons developed over 14 drafts in 2018 with input from the Strategic Communications Team and numerous County Directors. A prototype was displayed at the Statewide Conference in April 2018, where we received great feedback including the locations of a couple of satellite offices we didn't know about!

The final product has a classic look and feel to it, with numerous design elements from the ANR Branding toolkit. We created the map in ArcGIS Pro and designed it for bulk printing with a commercial 4-color offset printer. The later was anything but trivial, and we documented a number of tips and lessons learned in a new Tech Note.

Copies of the map have already been distributed to most County Directors and RECS, with a few more to go (if your office hasn't received one, please let us know!). We hope the map will educate visitors about ANR's geographic and programmatic breadth, as well as help orient new ANR employees to our amazing network and beautiful state.

A high-quality PDF copy of the map will be available in the ANR Repository in early 2019, making it easy to print additional copies at copy shops and office supply stores. The ANR network is alive and growing, so a map like this will never be finalized. We will continue to keep the PDF copy updated when we hear about changes to office locations and Statewide Programs. We love to get feedback, so please let us know what you think!

Posted on Friday, December 21, 2018 at 12:33 PM
Tags: IGIS (62)

Monterey is the Place to be for Drone Training in 2019

As drone usage continues to grow exponentially, 2019 stands to be another busy year for the IGIS drone training program. We are pleased to announce two offerings of our popular 3-day comprehensive drone mapping short course, both of which will be held in Monterey County with two outstanding collaborators.

From April 9-12, 2019, we'll be teaching the second annual Drones for Biologists workshop at the gorgeous Hastings Natural History Reservation in collaboration with The Wildlife Society Western Section and the UC Natural Reserve System. This training event specifically caters to the interests of natural resource managers, and includes special sessions on using drones for wildlife research, UAV regulations from the US Fish Wildlife Service, and updates from the CA Dept of Fish and Wildlife. New for 2019, participants will have an option to stay for an extra two days to conduct a mentored research project (can you detect turkeys with drones?), that we plan to collectively write up and submit for publication. If you've never been to Hastings, it's a beautiful 2,500-acre oak woodland reserve in the Carmel Valley with onsite accommodation and training facilities. Registration is now open, with discounted rates for TWS members and UCANR employees.

Data Analysis Exercise, Drones for Biologists Workshop
 
The week of June 17, 2019, we'll be offering our third round of DroneCamp. This is our flagship drone training event, and like previous DroneCamps, the 3-day curriculum will cover an overview of drone mapping technology, regulations, mission planning, flight practice, data processing and management, and analysis with GIS software. This year, we're thrilled to be collaborating with the DART Consortium, a public-private-nonprofit partnership in Monterey centered around developing the UC Monterey Bay Science and Technology Center (UCMBEST), establishing a drone tech R&D park at the former Fort Ord, and developing programs at the UC Santa Cruz Fort Ord Natural Reserve. To add icing on the cake, DroneCamp 2019 will merge seamlessly into the DART Drone Symposium on Friday June 21. The symposium will feature sessions from industry, leading researchers, and service providers. If you've ever sought a truly comprehensive week of drone mapping instruction with updates from the cutting edge, you'd be hard pressed to find a better pairing than DroneCamp plus the DART Symposium. Registration for both events will be open in February.
 
Flight Instruction at DroneCamp

We're thrilled to be providing these two trainings on drone data collection for the public, and even more thrilled to be working with collaborators who complement our areas of expertise with deep dives into technology developments, research, and policy. To use drones effectively involves navigating some deep waters, these workshops will save aspiring drone users vast amounts of time, money and painful mishaps. Hope to see you there!

 

Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2018 at 2:54 PM
Tags: dronecamp (3), drones (19), IGIS (62)

California Adaptation Clearinghouse Website Launched

IGIS and the California Naturalist Program are pleased to help celebrate the launch of a new information portal on climate adaptation. The California Adaptation Clearinghouse was officially launched at the California Adaptation Forum in August in Sacramento. The site was developed by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) in collaboration with the UC Berkeley Geospatial Innovation Facility, CalNat, and IGIS.

The Clearinghouse is a database-driven platform with a wealth of curated resources for climate adaptation. The site originated out of Senate Bill 246, which mandates OPR to provide resources on climate adaptation for local governments, regional planning agencies, and other practitioners working on adaptation and resilience. The database also contains sea-level rise resources collected by the Ocean Protection Council under Assembly Bill 2516. It's an amazing resource for anyone looking to strengthen climate change preparedness in their local government, community, or business.

The database includes numerous planning resources that have been developed and vetted by experts in the field. For example, the Urban Sustainability Directors Network has a how-to guide for local governments on developing equitable, community-driven climate preparedness plans, which you can find in the Clearinghouse. There are also examples of vulnerability assessments, local plans, and funding strategies. The majority of resources are hosted by other organizations, but unlike a Google search all the resources in the Clearinghouse have been reviewed, annotated, and cataloged by subject matter specialists.

To help find resources, the Clearinghouse has a number of search options, including more than a dozen topic categories adapted from Safeguarding California, the state's overall roadmap for building climate change resiliency. You can also search by Type of Impact (e.g., drought, sea level rise), Resource Type (e.g., case study, assessment, policy guidance), and of course an interactive map. Each resource has a descriptive blurb so you can quickly find what you need.

Adaptation planning can be information intensive, so the Tools and Data section of the website is devoted to helping people find data and crunch the numbers. Interested in rangelands? Check out the CA Landscape Conservation Cooperative's compiled Threat Assessments to California Rangelands. Sea level rise? Perhaps the CosMos modeling tool from USGS, or the Surging Seas tool from Climate Central. Like all resources, each tool and dataset has a user-friendly description, a technical summary, a bit about the data, and links to the source. One of our favorites is the California Energy Commission's Cal-Adapt, which includes both historical and projected climate data downscaled for California.

Providing a more personal perspective, the Clearinghouse also contains stories about climate adaptation from individuals, community groups, and businesses. The stories were collected by the UC ANR California Naturalist Program and their vast network of certified naturalists. The climate stories are diverse and compelling, from a concerned grandmother who becomes engaged in a community choice energy program, to a solar project engineer working to strengthen measures to prevent heat stroke in field staff. An interactive Story Map developed by IGIS helps users find stories from their area, some of which even have audio or video clips so you can hear the story in the speaker's own words.

Climate adaptation is complicated, but information portals like the Clearinghouse allow anyone to tap into the incredible amount of work that has already been done in California and elsewhere. Rather than reinvent the wheel, local agencies can build upon vetted guidelines from similar areas. We are all fortunate that the State of California has invested in a platform to share curated resources for the long-term, because climate adaptation is already part of the new normal. More resources are in the pipeline, so check it out and then check back often to see what's new.

Posted on Tuesday, December 4, 2018 at 4:29 PM
Tags: Adaptation (1), CalNat (1), Clearinghouse (1), Climate Change (2), IGIS (62), OPR (1)

Mapping post-fire landscapes at Hopland Research & Extension Center

The River Fire began July 27, 2018 at 1pm on Old River Road in Hopland. By the evening it had spread, and was threatening numerous buildings in the area. We have a ANR Research and Extension Center (HREC) there, and Shane Feirer from IGIS lives and works here. Evacuations were ordered quickly, and down in the bay area we all held our breath hoping the fire wouldn’t harm people or animals or consume the HREC buildings. By the time it was contained (as part of the Mendocino Complex), it had burned 48,920 acres. We’ve been flying drones over HREC for awhile, and the last month we did more drone flights to map the post-fire landscape. We flew some Hangar 360 flights with a DJI Phantom to get some sweet overviews of the scene (example1, example2, example3), and flew much of the area with our eBee on the first mission and Matrices on the second mission with both multispectral and RGB cameras.

These pics below compare the eBee imagery (2cm) with Planet imagery (3m).





These are pics of the eBee (far left) and the Matrice (far right) getting ready to fly into the blackened landscape, and some snaps from the Hanger pics.





Posted on Monday, October 8, 2018 at 10:24 PM
Tags: drones (19), igis (62)

Tag proliferation!

I've come to rely on this, my blog, for recalling important work related events, places, tools, and datasets. But, it is a bit unwieldy as a search engine. Perhaps it is delayed spring cleaning (ok, delayed like 12 years...), but I feel that have way too many tags on this blog, and it could do with a tidy-up. I started the blog back in 2006 (ok, I didn't start it, Ken-ichi did, back when he was a Kellylabber), and since then its been fair game as far as tags go. What to tag a post about "drones"? fine, why not also tag it as "UAVs"! Like old maps? Tag a post "cool old maps" and "history"! You get the pic. As of now I have 88 tags. My go-tos are: 

  • conferences: where I give my wrap-ups from meetings, and provide some perspective along with new software, data, etc. 
  • class: where I capture stuff for class; and 
  • data and software: where I tag new stuff I need to follow up on. 

So... from 88 I am going to move to 10. The core are "people", "data", and "tools", and there are a few more. They are: 

  • class: for all things class related; and conferences: keep up the wrap-ups!
  • the triad: people: all things collaboration related; data: obvi, from drones, to imagery, to mobile, to pics; tools: analytics and apps and all the rest;
  • the groupsgif: cool posts related to the gif; igis: cool posts related to IGIS; lab: for all the wonderful student work;
  • science: all the domains we focus on; and
  • meta: for all the culture about mapping: papers, literature, movies and music videos.

Wow. Hope it works. Now I have to reclass all the original 88 into their new homes. 

Posted on Thursday, August 2, 2018 at 4:18 PM

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